An Open and Affirming Congregation of the United Church of Christ

Affirming statement of welcome

We, the members of Zion United Church of Christ, welcome you.

If you are Asian, Hispanic, Black, or White;
If you are male, female, or transgender;
If you are 3 days old, 33 years old, or 103 years old;
If you've never stepped foot in a church, a synagogue, a temple, a cathedral, or a mosque;
If you are single, married, widowed, divorced, separated, or partnered;
If you are straight, gay, lesbian, bisexual, or yet unsure of your sexuality;
If you are a Republican, Democrat, Independent, Socialist, Libertarian, affiliated with another political party or no party at all:
If you are pro life, or pro choice;
If you have, or have had, addictions, phobias, or a criminal record;
If you own your home, rent, live with your parents, or are homeless;
If you have typical or atypical skills or are just beginning to sense your God given gifts and talent;

However the rest of the world describes you, and however you describe yourself.

You are welcome at Zion.

Being fully welcome in our community here at Zion United Church of Christ means that our congregation will:

  • Always seek to affirm the person that you are with loving hearts and open minds.
  • Follow the way of Christ Jesus with you in loving and being loved by both God and neighbor, with the guidance and power of the Holy Spirit.
  • Love you for the person you are by living out our denomination's promise that "No matter who you are, or where you are on life's journey, you are welcome at Zion UCC."

(Portions adapted from the Affirmation of Welcome of
Prince of Peace Lutheran Church, ELCA; Philadelphia, PA USA)

 

 

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Recent Message

Rev. Beth Gedert
For weeks we have been talking about the warnings that the ancient Hebrews received from God. If they continued to act as though they didn't want a relationship with God, regardless of what they said, eventually they would get what they wanted. And they did. First the northern kingdom of Israel was destroyed and the southern kingdom of Judah was invaded, Jerusalem was sacked, the temple was demolished and the best and brightest were taken into Exile in Babylon. Years later, some of them returned to Judah, but not all of them. Some of them made a new life for themselves in Babylon, which God had invited them to do. The story of Esther takes place more than one hundred years after the Exile. The Jews in this story are not people longing to go home. They are descendants of immigrants, citizens who are nonetheless still recognized as "different." They are working out the complexity of living as the people of God in a foreign land.