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12.09.18

Esther 4

Rev. Beth Gedert
Description
For weeks we have been talking about the warnings that the ancient Hebrews received from God. If they continued to act as though they didn't want a relationship with God, regardless of what they said, eventually they would get what they wanted. And they did. First the northern kingdom of Israel was destroyed and the southern kingdom of Judah was invaded, Jerusalem was sacked, the temple was demolished and the best and brightest were taken into Exile in Babylon. Years later, some of them returned to Judah, but not all of them.
11.18.18

Isaiah 36-37 and 2

Rev. Beth Gedert
Description

This morning we have another reading from the prophets, this time the prophet Isaiah, first a story and then a prophecy. In order for it to make sense, let me give you a little background. After the kingdom split into north Israel and south Judah, things continue to degrade until 721 BC when Assyria invades the northern kingdom of Israel and destroys it. After that the southern kingdom of Judah pays tribute to Assyria so they don't get invaded. Eventually they get tired of that and make a pact with their old enemy Egypt and rebel against Assyria.

11.11.18

Micah 6

Rev. Beth Gedert
Description

For the next four weeks we will be reading from the prophets. Prophets in the ancient Afro-Asiatic world were messengers, delivering words from God to the people. Sometimes these are words of warning, sometimes they are words of comfort, usually they are a combination of both. The prophets we are reading from are referred to as the classical prophets. They aren't miracle workers and they speak mainly to the common people, instead of to the king and the power brokers. Sometimes they do strange things, called prophetic acts, to make a point.

11.04.18

2 Kings 5

Rev. Beth Gedert
Description

Our Scripture reading for this morning might not be very familiar to you. It's a rather obscure story and has several parts to it. We are only going to read a small portion of it. After the death of King Solomon, the kingdom he ruled split into south and north. The southern portion is called Judah, and the northern portion retains the name Israel. The main action of today's story takes place in Israel. But it starts in far away. It starts in the country of Aram, the city of Damascus, which is modern-day Syria. Because this story is backwards from what we think should happen.

10.28.18

1 Kings 3

Rev. Beth Gedert
Description

Last week we heard a story from the life of Israel's great King David, a story both disturbing and redemptive, about how King David and Queen Bathsheba came to be married. This morning we hear the story of their second son, King Solomon. Solomon is the end of the golden age of ancient Israel. After he dies, the kingdom splits into north and south and descends into chaos and infighting and eventually both kingdoms are invaded and conquered, and the people carried into exile. This didn't happen for no reason.

10.21.18

2 Samuel 11 and 12

Rev. Beth Gedert
Description

Twelve years ago a bunch of Lutherans in Minnesota got together and created a preaching plan called the Narrative Lectionary. It's a four year cycle of preaching through the Bible. And because I chose to follow it when I became your pastor last year, this week we read the story of David and Bathsheba. This week, in the wake of a new Supreme Court Justice and rallies protesting rape culture on college campuses and the body of a homeless woman being set on fire in a public park, we read a story about lust, and coveting and lying and murder. Coincidence or God? You decide.

10.14.18

UCC Access Sunday -- Joshua 24:1-15 and Luke 14:16-21

Rev. Gunnar Cerda
Description

A couple of years ago, a mother shared this with me: “My husband and I are members of a very large [deleted denomination] church…going on 8 years. After 5 years of not missing a Sunday or Wednesday, our infant son was diagnosed w/autism and a few other physical problems. Attendance started to dwindle as he was not enjoying all of the over-stimulation. One of us always ended up taking him out to the car and getting his stroller and pushing him around the large parking lot.

10.07.18

Exodus 19 & 20

Rev. Beth Gedert
Description

Even if you didn't grow up in church, our text for this morning is going to be very familiar to you. It's the 10 Commandments. These are the guidelines for life given to the Ancient Hebrews, after they have been liberated from bondage in Egypt. These descendants of Abraham are blessed to be a blessing, but currently find themselves wandering in the wilderness. For four hundred years they have been living outside of the land of their ancestors, trying to keep their traditions alive in a culture determined to squash them.

09.30.18

Exodus 14

Rev. Beth Staten
Description

The Bible is a drama in six phases. Phase 1 is Creation: a good God makes a good world and fills it with good things. Phase 2 is Crisis: the good creatures begin to use their God-given free will to damage themselves and the good world. Phase 3 is Calling: God responds to Crisis by calling a tribe of people to represent God's intention for the world and resist evil, by making a covenant with them. And then in Phase 4, this tribe goes through Cycles of following God's calling, then drifting or rebelling, and then repenting and returning to God's agenda.

09.23.18

Genesis 12 and 39

Rev. Beth Staten
Description

The Bible is a drama in six phases. Phase 1 is Creation: a good God makes a good world and fills it with good things. Phase 2 is Crisis: the good creatures begin to use their God-given free will to make not good choices. Not always, but small individual choices turn into big nasty systems of sin and injustice. A few weeks ago we heard the story of the great flood, and the promise God made afterwards to never again destroy the world in a flood. God promised to never again respond to our violence with the same kind of violence.

Recent Message

Rev. Beth Gedert
For weeks we have been talking about the warnings that the ancient Hebrews received from God. If they continued to act as though they didn't want a relationship with God, regardless of what they said, eventually they would get what they wanted. And they did. First the northern kingdom of Israel was destroyed and the southern kingdom of Judah was invaded, Jerusalem was sacked, the temple was demolished and the best and brightest were taken into Exile in Babylon. Years later, some of them returned to Judah, but not all of them. Some of them made a new life for themselves in Babylon, which God had invited them to do. The story of Esther takes place more than one hundred years after the Exile. The Jews in this story are not people longing to go home. They are descendants of immigrants, citizens who are nonetheless still recognized as "different." They are working out the complexity of living as the people of God in a foreign land.