An Open and Affirming Congregation of the United Church of Christ

Affirming statement of welcome

We, the members of Zion United Church of Christ, welcome you.

If you are Asian, Hispanic, Black, or White;
If you are male, female, or transgender;
If you are 3 days old, 33 years old, or 103 years old;
If you've never stepped foot in a church, a synagogue, a temple, a cathedral, or a mosque;
If you are single, married, widowed, divorced, separated, or partnered;
If you are straight, gay, lesbian, bisexual, or yet unsure of your sexuality;
If you are a Republican, Democrat, Independent, Socialist, Libertarian, affiliated with another political party or no party at all:
If you are pro life, or pro choice;
If you have, or have had, addictions, phobias, or a criminal record;
If you own your home, rent, live with your parents, or are homeless;
If you have typical or atypical skills or are just beginning to sense your God given gifts and talent;

However the rest of the world describes you, and however you describe yourself.

You are welcome at Zion.

Being fully welcome in our community here at Zion United Church of Christ means that our congregation will:

  • Always seek to affirm the person that you are with loving hearts and open minds.
  • Follow the way of Christ Jesus with you in loving and being loved by both God and neighbor, with the guidance and power of the Holy Spirit.
  • Love you for the person you are by living out our denomination's promise that "No matter who you are, or where you are on life's journey, you are welcome at Zion UCC."

(Portions adapted from the Affirmation of Welcome of
Prince of Peace Lutheran Church, ELCA; Philadelphia, PA USA)

 

 

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Recent Message

Pastor Beth Staten

We continue this week with a series on the apostle Paul's letter to the church in the very Roman city of Philippi. We think this church was mostly made of Gentile converts because this letter really doesn't contain any Jewish imagery or Old Testament references. This is a letter of consolation, written to help the church learn how to have joy in all circumstances. Last week we talked about how the healthiest practice of our faith is a practice of interdependence. This week's reading follows along that same theme, encouraging the people of the church church to live in a unity that is based in humility, with Jesus as the perfect demonstration. It contains some really famous verses that have become a significant part of our dogma about the nature of Christ. And while I believe most of the theology that has developed from these verses, I just want to remind you that they weren't originally written as an explanation of dogma.